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Edward Graham - DHS Report Offers Electromagnetic Pulse Protection Measures for Critical Infrastructure:

/

#CriticalInfrastructure #CIPA #DHS #FEMA #ElectromagneticPulse #EMP #EMPProtection #ElectricalGrid #SpaceWeather #Mitigation #Resiliency #CyberSecurity

The report uses approaches for safeguarding the National Public Warning System as a blueprint for defending other vital systems and services from electromagnetic pulses.

www.nextgov.com

07/04/2022

Happy 4th of July, America! May it be an "Epik" celebration!
• Revive Freedom.
• Restore Truth.
• Rebuild America.

At the core of Epik is our commitment to the principles that have made America a great, leading nation for the cause of liberty, truth and a free society. These principles have been under attack more than ever by opposing, tyrannical forces within big tech, major media channels, corrupt political agendas, anti-American foreign allegiances, and rejection of the Judeo-Christian beliefs upon which our nation was founded and have been the bedrock of American values.

These principles govern our corporate policies and practices and define our purpose at Epik, in our efforts to preserve American values and advance fair market capitalism through innovative, “access-for-all” technologies.

As one of the world’s leading domain registrars, we have a mission to empower freedom, abundance and resiliency in the digital age, and have successfully preserved the digital rights of thousands of patriotic, God-fearing Americans from becoming victims of elitism, censorship, attacks, and cancellation. Our suite of innovative technologies enables us to provide secure alternatives to big tech censorship and control for all seeking digital sanctuary and resiliency.

"Empowering Freedom, Abundance, and Resiliency in the Digital Age!"
The World is YOUR Domain! - Epik

#4thofjuly2022 #BeEpik #Epik #liberty #freedom
https://vimeo.com/726508484

Empowering Freedom, Abundance and Resiliency in the Digital Age! At the core of Epik is our commitment to the principles that have made America a great, leading…

vimeo.com

12/20/2021

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
December 20, 2021, Updated: December 20, 2021
San Clemente, Calif.,, on Oct. 20, 2020.
By Brandon Drey

San Clemente Adopts Plan to Combat Ocean Rising Threats

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif.—The San Clemente City Council unanimously adopted a plan in December, which it said was aimed at staving off future potential impacts to its beaches and shores due to rising sea levels, and coastal erosion.

The so-called Coastal Resilience Plan seeks to address a range of issues—everything from easing incremental shoreline erosion all the way to a worst-case scenario where the region’s sea wall—which protects homes, for example—would be gone.

According to the plan, the wearing away of beaches is due to the gradual rise of the ocean.

But one councilman—who ultimately voted for the plan—disagreed with the overall plan’s assessment that the issue was due to rising sea levels.

Councilman Steve Knoblock said erosion is the man-made result of officials no longer moving sand from two nearby rivers to San Clemente beaches, a remedy called “sand replenishment.”

He additionally said too much residential development has disrupted how sand moves—and ultimately rests—underneath the ocean’s surface.

“People were given dominion over the earth,” Knoblock said. “Natural long occurring erosion is silly to me. It’s bad science, it makes no sense, and it plays into a narrative that man is the trespasser on this earth instead of the caretaker of the earth.”

Epoch Times Photo
A Cobra Attack Helicopter flies past at Calafia Beach in San Clemente, Calif., on Dec. 8, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)
Since the 1950s, Knoblock said the San Juan Creek—a 29-mile stream starting near Dana Point which runs to Riverside County— flowed freely into the ocean, carrying sand during the winter, to the beaches of San Clemente.

However, according to Knoblock, years of housing development have stopped this so-called sand migration.

Others close to the issue agree.

“We lost our sand supply and our transportation system through human engineering for the development of South Orange County,” said Don Brown, director of Pier Pride, a non-profit formed in 2020 that partners with the city and community stakeholders to preserve the Pier’s needs.

Brown, who moved to San Clemente in 1971 and served on the city’s planning commission for a decade, said he witnessed landmarks on the beach dissipate due to “unintended consequences” from county developers since the 1980s.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recommended in 2016 to place some 250,000 cubic yards, or approximately 3,400 feet of sand, along the San Clemente shoreline from Linda Lane to South T-Street beaches. Doing so, per the report, would ultimately widen the beach by 50 feet.

The report also indicated that such an infusion of sand should occur every handful of years.

According to Brown, that process could begin as early as next year.

After years of designing and pre-construction monitoring, replenishing the sand will drive the Coastal Resiliency Plan forward.

However, councilman Knoblock remained skeptical about the next phase and suggested the city hires a full-time “sandman.”

Coastal Newport Beach has also experienced erosion in recent years. As a result, the city takes sand annually from the Santa Ana River to replenish its shorelines, according to San Clemente councilman Knoblock.

Some San Clemente officials also said they worry that the newly approved plan will address rising sea levels threatening the embankment protecting railroad tracks near beaches and the area’s sea wall.

Meanwhile, San Clemente’s newly approved “resilience” plan lays out three scenarios, or “trigger points,” that could pose a threat—without mitigation—to the region if sea levels rise.

Epoch Times Photo
A view of City Hall in San Clemente, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

With just a small amount of rise—at 8 inches—the report said, beaches could lose about half of their width, impacting existing structures like the city’s Municipal Pier, its Marine Safety Building, and some railroads.

The plan says that at about 3 feet, smaller beaches may disappear entirely during some months of the year. And at about 5-feet, sea walls and railroads would be wiped out, placing homes and other structures atop San Clemente’s bluffs in danger of collapse due to incessant pounding waves.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration out of La Jolla, Calif., the sea rises, currently, at about one-eighth of an inch per year.

Experts project a global sea-level rise of “another 1 to 8 feet by 2100.”

Aside from Knoblock’s view of the erosion problem, he said the city’s new plan made “superfluous assumptions.”

He also said the plan is now just a series of recommendations, which, he said, he hoped did not turn into legislative fiat in the future.

“I just have to say as future councils look at this, I hope this does not become a regulatory document, but incrementalism in government tends to lean that way,” he said.

The newly adopted plan recommends tracking water levels, re-establishing an annual shoreline monitoring program, and identifying erosion hot spots.

Additionally, it recommends the establishment of a mechanism to raise funds for coastal resiliency programs and projects.

The plan also suggested the re-establishment of the beach sand placement program.

Epoch Times Photo
A beach view in San Clemente, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)
Brandon Drey

https://www.theepochtimes.com/san-clemente-adopts-plan-to-combat-ocean-rising-threats_4168864.html

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif.—The San Clemente City Council unanimously adopted a plan in December, which it said was aimed ...

www.theepochtimes.com

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Edward Graham - DHS Report Offers Electromagnetic Pulse Protection Measures for Critical Infrastructure:

/

#CriticalInfrastructure #CIPA #DHS #FEMA #ElectromagneticPulse #EMP #EMPProtection #ElectricalGrid #SpaceWeather #Mitigation #Resiliency #CyberSecurity

The report uses approaches for safeguarding the National Public Warning System as a blueprint for defending other vital systems and services from electromagnetic pulses.

www.nextgov.com

07/04/2022

Happy 4th of July, America! May it be an "Epik" celebration!
• Revive Freedom.
• Restore Truth.
• Rebuild America.

At the core of Epik is our commitment to the principles that have made America a great, leading nation for the cause of liberty, truth and a free society. These principles have been under attack more than ever by opposing, tyrannical forces within big tech, major media channels, corrupt political agendas, anti-American foreign allegiances, and rejection of the Judeo-Christian beliefs upon which our nation was founded and have been the bedrock of American values.

These principles govern our corporate policies and practices and define our purpose at Epik, in our efforts to preserve American values and advance fair market capitalism through innovative, “access-for-all” technologies.

As one of the world’s leading domain registrars, we have a mission to empower freedom, abundance and resiliency in the digital age, and have successfully preserved the digital rights of thousands of patriotic, God-fearing Americans from becoming victims of elitism, censorship, attacks, and cancellation. Our suite of innovative technologies enables us to provide secure alternatives to big tech censorship and control for all seeking digital sanctuary and resiliency.

"Empowering Freedom, Abundance, and Resiliency in the Digital Age!"
The World is YOUR Domain! - Epik

#4thofjuly2022 #BeEpik #Epik #liberty #freedom
https://vimeo.com/726508484

Empowering Freedom, Abundance and Resiliency in the Digital Age! At the core of Epik is our commitment to the principles that have made America a great, leading…

vimeo.com

12/20/2021

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
December 20, 2021, Updated: December 20, 2021
San Clemente, Calif.,, on Oct. 20, 2020.
By Brandon Drey

San Clemente Adopts Plan to Combat Ocean Rising Threats

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif.—The San Clemente City Council unanimously adopted a plan in December, which it said was aimed at staving off future potential impacts to its beaches and shores due to rising sea levels, and coastal erosion.

The so-called Coastal Resilience Plan seeks to address a range of issues—everything from easing incremental shoreline erosion all the way to a worst-case scenario where the region’s sea wall—which protects homes, for example—would be gone.

According to the plan, the wearing away of beaches is due to the gradual rise of the ocean.

But one councilman—who ultimately voted for the plan—disagreed with the overall plan’s assessment that the issue was due to rising sea levels.

Councilman Steve Knoblock said erosion is the man-made result of officials no longer moving sand from two nearby rivers to San Clemente beaches, a remedy called “sand replenishment.”

He additionally said too much residential development has disrupted how sand moves—and ultimately rests—underneath the ocean’s surface.

“People were given dominion over the earth,” Knoblock said. “Natural long occurring erosion is silly to me. It’s bad science, it makes no sense, and it plays into a narrative that man is the trespasser on this earth instead of the caretaker of the earth.”

Epoch Times Photo
A Cobra Attack Helicopter flies past at Calafia Beach in San Clemente, Calif., on Dec. 8, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)
Since the 1950s, Knoblock said the San Juan Creek—a 29-mile stream starting near Dana Point which runs to Riverside County— flowed freely into the ocean, carrying sand during the winter, to the beaches of San Clemente.

However, according to Knoblock, years of housing development have stopped this so-called sand migration.

Others close to the issue agree.

“We lost our sand supply and our transportation system through human engineering for the development of South Orange County,” said Don Brown, director of Pier Pride, a non-profit formed in 2020 that partners with the city and community stakeholders to preserve the Pier’s needs.

Brown, who moved to San Clemente in 1971 and served on the city’s planning commission for a decade, said he witnessed landmarks on the beach dissipate due to “unintended consequences” from county developers since the 1980s.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recommended in 2016 to place some 250,000 cubic yards, or approximately 3,400 feet of sand, along the San Clemente shoreline from Linda Lane to South T-Street beaches. Doing so, per the report, would ultimately widen the beach by 50 feet.

The report also indicated that such an infusion of sand should occur every handful of years.

According to Brown, that process could begin as early as next year.

After years of designing and pre-construction monitoring, replenishing the sand will drive the Coastal Resiliency Plan forward.

However, councilman Knoblock remained skeptical about the next phase and suggested the city hires a full-time “sandman.”

Coastal Newport Beach has also experienced erosion in recent years. As a result, the city takes sand annually from the Santa Ana River to replenish its shorelines, according to San Clemente councilman Knoblock.

Some San Clemente officials also said they worry that the newly approved plan will address rising sea levels threatening the embankment protecting railroad tracks near beaches and the area’s sea wall.

Meanwhile, San Clemente’s newly approved “resilience” plan lays out three scenarios, or “trigger points,” that could pose a threat—without mitigation—to the region if sea levels rise.

Epoch Times Photo
A view of City Hall in San Clemente, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

With just a small amount of rise—at 8 inches—the report said, beaches could lose about half of their width, impacting existing structures like the city’s Municipal Pier, its Marine Safety Building, and some railroads.

The plan says that at about 3 feet, smaller beaches may disappear entirely during some months of the year. And at about 5-feet, sea walls and railroads would be wiped out, placing homes and other structures atop San Clemente’s bluffs in danger of collapse due to incessant pounding waves.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration out of La Jolla, Calif., the sea rises, currently, at about one-eighth of an inch per year.

Experts project a global sea-level rise of “another 1 to 8 feet by 2100.”

Aside from Knoblock’s view of the erosion problem, he said the city’s new plan made “superfluous assumptions.”

He also said the plan is now just a series of recommendations, which, he said, he hoped did not turn into legislative fiat in the future.

“I just have to say as future councils look at this, I hope this does not become a regulatory document, but incrementalism in government tends to lean that way,” he said.

The newly adopted plan recommends tracking water levels, re-establishing an annual shoreline monitoring program, and identifying erosion hot spots.

Additionally, it recommends the establishment of a mechanism to raise funds for coastal resiliency programs and projects.

The plan also suggested the re-establishment of the beach sand placement program.

Epoch Times Photo
A beach view in San Clemente, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)
Brandon Drey

https://www.theepochtimes.com/san-clemente-adopts-plan-to-combat-ocean-rising-threats_4168864.html

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif.—The San Clemente City Council unanimously adopted a plan in December, which it said was aimed ...

www.theepochtimes.com

11/13/2021

PUBLISHED: 18:39 EST, 13 November 2021 | UPDATED: 20:11 EST, 13 November 2021
California ports hit 17-day record logjam as supply chain crisis continues to disrupt shipping, while Newsom attempts to double DMV capacity for commercial licenses to tackle truck driver shortage

* There were as many as 83 ships at anchor and in a holding pattern outside ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach as of Friday night, a new record

* The nearly 17-day wait is double the wait time from two months ago

* California Governor Gavin Newsom is attempting to address the problem by doubling capacities at the state's DMV

* The logjams at the ports come as strained supply chains have caused controversy for President Joe Biden

The logjam at California's ports for ships to wait is now as long as 17 days - a new record amid the continuing supply chain crisis just weeks before Black Friday and the holidays usually turn spending into overdrive..

There were as many as 83 ships at anchor and in a holding pattern outside ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach as of Friday night, officials said.

The nearly 17-day wait is double the wait time from just two months ago.

WATCH: Read More

California Gov. Gavin Newsom is attempting to address the problem by doubling capacities at the state's DMV in an effort to conduct more commercial driving tests and ease the truck driver shortage.

'With today's announcement, we'll get more truckers on the road to get goods where they need to go faster,' Newsom said. 'The supply chain crisis is not a California specific problem, but we've taken swift action to relieve congestion and increase our capacity to move goods quickly.'

The California DMV will open up Saturday hours at various test sites.

The logjams at the ports come as strained supply chains have caused controversy for President Joe Biden as they combine with inflation and shortages of workers.

Record inflation and supply-chain shortages are driving customers to shop for bargains at discount stores, where spending jumped 65 percent last week as consumer prices hit the highest level in 31 years as the crucial holiday shopping season approaches.

Biden headed to his home in Delaware for the weekend amid the continued crisis, in addition to ongoing trouble at the US/Mexico border.

Cargo ships waited in the waters off Los Angeles on Thursday amid a record backlog at the ports

As many as 83 boats have been either anchored or in a holding zone as of Friday night, moored off the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports

The Port of Long Beach, seen above on November 12, and the Port of Los Angeles are currently dealing with over two-week long logjams of ships waiting to come in

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (pictured) is attempting to ramp up production by allowing for more commercial license tests at DMVs in order to remedy the truck driver shortage

Trucks haul shipping containers out of the Port of Los Angeles in late October

'Every sector of the supply chain has reached capacity,' Port of Long Beach Executive Director Mario Cordero said in a statement earlier this week. 'We are trying to add capacity by searching for vacant land to store containers, expanding the hours of operation at terminals, and implementing a fee that will incentivize ocean carriers to pull their containers out of the port as soon as possible.'

Biden said on Wednesday that most Americans cannot understand the problems faced by the United States' supply chains, adding that 'not a lot of people' have a clear grasp of the networks and their implications.

Since September, the United States has - like other countries around the world - been battling snarled supply chains.

Ships have spent days off the coasts of the world's major ports, unable to unload their cargo due to a shortage of delivery drivers and technical staff. Container ships have plied their routes with their vessels only partially loaded, due to logistical issues in ports and warehouses.

The crisis has led to fears that stores may not have enough supplies for the holidays, and gifts may not arrive.

Biden has said before that the knock-on effect of the supply chain problems were scarcely understood.

On Saturday, he said: 'If we were all going out and having lunch together and I said, 'Let's ask whoever's in the next table, no matter what restaurant we're in, have them explain the supply chain to us.' Do you think they'd understand what we're talking about?

'They're smart people,' the president added, but he concluded the current crisis was a part of a 'complicated world.'

Biden also said Saturday that he has yet to see a reporter outline 'very well' how supply chains work.

Biden tours the Port of Baltimore, the 12th busiest in the United States, in November 2021 amid the ongoing supply chain crisis

The Port of Baltimore is the nation’s largest port for specialized cargo and passenger facilities

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 6.2 percent in October 2021 from one year prior - the highest it has been since 1990

The Consumer Price Index shows a rise in prices in every category from used cars, laundry equipment, furniture to food

VIDEO

Earlier on Wednesday an inflation report showed the largest annual increase in prices in three decades.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said that prices in October rose 0.9 per cent from September — and more than 6 per cent over the past year, the largest annual rise in 30 years.

'I'm here to talk about one of the most pressing economic concerns of the American people,' he said. 'And it's real.

'And that is getting prices down, number one.

'Number two, making sure our stores are fully stocked.

'And number three, getting a lot of people back to work while tracking and tackling these two above challenges.'

Speaking at the port of Baltimore, where he touted his $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill - which was passed by Congress earlier this month, and which he plans to sign into law on Monday - Biden said that investing in resiliency was essential.

'You hear a lot about the supply chains in the news, but frankly, not a lot of people have a clear understanding, whether they have a Ph.D. or they didn't go to school, about how a supply chain works,' the president said.

'In simple terms, supply chain is just the journey that a product takes to get to your doorstep,' he said.

President Biden said it was understandable that most people did not fully comprehend the complexity of global supply chains +12
President Biden said it was understandable that most people did not fully comprehend the complexity of global supply chains

The president in Baltimore also admitted that his decision to send out stimulus checks contributed to the current high inflation.

'The irony is people have more money now because of the first major piece of legislation I passed.

'You all got checks for $1,400. You got checks for a whole range of things,' Biden said, referencing his COVID relief checks sent out in April.

'If you're a mom and you have kids under the age of 7, you get $300 a month and if it's over 7 to 17, you're getting $360 a month,' he said, misstating the second amount, which is $250 per month.

'It changes people's lives. But what happens if there's nothing to buy and you got more money to compete for getting [goods]? It creates a real problem.'

'On the one hand, we're facing new disruptions to our supplies. At the same time, we're also experiencing higher demand for goods because wages are up as well as people have money in the bank. And because of the strength of our economic recovery, American families have been able to buy more products.'

Biden said it was 'easily understandable' why Americans would not comprehend how 'incredibly complex' supply chains work, because they rarely crossed peoples' minds.

'As long as goods and materials are getting where they need to go on time, there's usually no need to worry about the supply chains,' Biden said.

RELATED ARTICLES

* Bidenflation drives Americans to dollar stores: Spending at...

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He said he believed the problem was temporary, and that the economy would stabilize.

'People are not going out to dinner and lunch and going to local bars because of COVID. So what are they doing? They're staying home and ordering online and they're buying product.' Biden said.

'Well with more people with money buying product and less product to buy, what happens?

'The supply chain's the reason, the answer is you guys, I'll get to that in a minute. But what happens? Prices go up.'

Data compiled by transaction data insight firm Facteus showed discount store spending was up 65 percent last week over the same period in 2019, with Dollar General accounting for 22 percent of the category's market share, while big box powerhouse Wal-Mart accounted for 45 percent.

Target represented 15 percent of last week's discount store market share, according to the data, with Ross at six percent and Big Lots at three percent.

A Facteus consumer report shows discount store spending jumped 65 percent last week

Discount store shopping was also hot last month when sales at My Family Dollar increased by $11.1million, more than 30 percent above average, Facteus said.

The latest consumer statistics were released as the Consumer Price Index (CPI) revealed inflation is at its highest level in 31 years.

Prices of everyday consumer goods rose 6.2 percent in October 2021 - the highest it has been since November 1990.

President Joe Biden has blamed the 6.2 percent increase in the cost of living on 'market manipulation' and rising gas prices, despite the nation's top economists pointing to the country's supply-chain shortages and businesses struggling to meet the demand from COVID shutdowns as the reason for the rise in prices.

The CPI showed gas prices jumped a whopping 59 percent over last year, as the cost of meat increased 24 percent.

Biden said in a statement on Wednesday his $1.2 trillion Build Back Better plan will help slow the growing inflation problem and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has vowed inflation will not reach the exorbitant levels they were at during the Carter years, even as household debt increases to a record high.

The president also said Wednesday that most Americans cannot understand the problems faced by the United States' supply chains, adding that 'not a lot of people' have a clear grasp of the networks and their implications.

RELATED ARTICLES

* Bidenflation drives Americans to dollar stores: Spending at...

* Biden claims Americans aren't clever enough to understand...

Atlanta, Georgia saw the highest rate of inflation at 7.9 percent, while the coastal cities of New York and San Francisco saw more manageable price increases over last year

He said that the U.S. was feeling the effects of a positive sentiment in the economy.

Biden said that 'more products are being delivered than ever before — that's because people have little more breathing room than they did last year. And that's a good thing.

'But it also means we've got higher demand for goods at the same time we're facing disruptions in the supplies to make those goods. This is a recipe for delays and for higher prices.'

Strained supply chains have become an economic drag on the world's largest economy and a political risk for President Joe Biden as the disruptions put upward pressure on inflation while highlighting shortages of workers, including truck drivers and warehouse staff. Consumer sentiment is deteriorating amid a spike in the cost of living.

'Every sector of the supply chain has reached capacity,' Port of Long Beach Executive Director Mario Cordero said in a statement this week announcing that its terminals had their second-busiest October on record.

The White House earlier this week touted incremental progress at L.A.-Long Beach-- a 20% decline in the number of containers sitting for more than nine days in the week to Nov. 8. The adjoining gateways for 40% of the nation's containerized imports have handled 17% more volume this year, while their land-side storage capacity remained unchanged.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10199137/Backup-container-ships-outside-California-nearly-17-days.html/

There were as many as 83 ships at anchor and in a holding pattern as of Friday night, a new record, officials said. The nearly 17-day wait is double the wait time from two months ago.

www.dailymail.co.uk

11/07/2021

Gov. Phil Murphy claims Dems 'might've been swept away' if it wasn't for his progressive NJ agenda and says he's 'screaming out' for DC to pass Build Back Better Act after narrow election win over GOP challenger

* Murphy won a second term by a razor thin margin of roughly 2% on Tuesday
* He was expected to easily win re-election in the weeks leading up to the vote
* The governor thinks his narrow victory is proof of progressive policies' popularity rather than a rebuke of them in what was expected to be an easy race
* He said NJ's progressive policies prove Build Back Better would be popular
* House Democrats passed a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure investment
* Pelosi promised progressives the larger bill would have a vote on November 15

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said on Sunday that Democrats in his state would have been 'swept away' in this past week's election had it not been for progressive policies like universal pre-K and raising the minimum wage.

Murphy credited the same policies included in President Joe Biden's progressive Build Back Better bill for getting him over the line to narrowly defeat his Republican challenger in a tight election last week.

'Thank God we put the programs in place we put in place, the actions we took, whether it’s expanding pre-K, raising the minimum wage, investing at all-time record levels in infrastructure because I think, had we not, we might’ve been swept away as well,' he told Meet the Press host Chuck Todd.

WATCH: Read More

He said 'there's a lot of hurt out there' after the coronavirus pandemic wreaked havoc on the economy - claiming that progressive policies are the way to recovery.

Murphy championed his densely-packed high-tax state as emblematic of the positive impact of those policies, as Democrats on Capitol Hill continue to bicker despite having come to a compromise on the $1.75 trillion measure and a smaller $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill.

'So you look at that debate in Washington and folks feel like, “Well, I wonder if this would work.” And I’m screaming out, "Listen, look at New Jersey. It is working. We’re doing this stuff and we know it works,"' Murphy said.

WATCH: MEET the PRESS NBC Universal Privacy Policy

Murphy said Democrats need to pay more attention to Americans' 'kitchen tables' to keep winning

He scored a second term in a narrow victory against GOP challenger Jack Ciattarelli, though polls indicated that it would be an easy win for Murphy

He said Tuesday's close election margins are evidence that 'a fair amount' of voters nationwide feel frustrated with the lack of action on Biden's sweeping social and climate reform measures.

Last week Murphy crawled over the finish line to a second term, ending with 50.92 percent of the vote to 48.32 against former state GOP lawmaker Jack Ciattarelli. It was expected to be an easy victory for Murphy for weeks leading up to Election Day.

In Virginia, where the only other gubernatorial election was held, Murphy's party fared considerably worse. Former Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe faced a stunning loss at the hands of first time political candidate Glenn Youngkin, a Republican businessman. Progressives like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez blamed party moderates for the loss.

Democrats managed to hold on to New Jersey's legislature, extending their almost-two decades-long reign in the blue stronghold. However, their grip loosened as Republicans gained ground in state and local races.

One of the most notable Democrat upsets was Senate President Steve Sweeney, one of the most powerful elected officials in New Jersey, losing his seat to a Republican truck driver who spent about $150 on his campaign.

Murphy called Sweeney's loss 'shocking' but chalked it up to Democrats' need to reconnect with families.

New Jersey's longtime Senate President Steve Sweeney lost his seat on Tuesday

Ed Durr, a Republican truck driver who spent $150 on his campaign, beat Sweeney in a stunning upset

Democrats across New Jersey underperformed last week. One of the most stunning twists in the state's election was the upset loss of New Jersey Senate President Steve Sweeney (left) to Republican truck driver Ed Durr (right)

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He again used it as an opportunity to tout his progressive policies, despite the fact that Sweeney was a supporter of many of Murphy's actions but still lost his race.

'We've got to get to more kitchen tables. I don't think that raising the minimum wage, expanding pre-K, making college health care more affordable, all-time high investments in infrastructure, I don't think that's a progressive, non-progressive agenda,' Murphy claimed.

'I think that's directed at making families' lives better and quality of life better. But we've got to clearly connect more deeply into more kitchen tables in this state.'

The governor did heap praise on his fellow Democrats in Washington for getting Biden's $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure compromise passed in the House on Friday.

The bill passed the Senate in August and was approved in the House late on Friday after months of negotiations. It passed by a margin of 228 'yes' votes to 206 'no' votes.

'This infrastructure bill on Friday, by the way, is a game changer,' Murphy said.

Democrats on Capitol Hill finally scored a victory for Biden when House lawmakers passed his bipartisan infrastructure bill (pictured: Biden and Pelosi trying to sway Democrats on Capitol Hill on October 28)

'And we're the most densely populated state in America, so it's a particular game changer for New Jersey.'

After weeks of gridlock, progressive lawmakers finally relented and voted for the measure - a historic investment in roads, bridges, water and broadband among other items - save for six in the self-titled 'Squad.'

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi struck a deal with their caucus and also passed a rule guaranteeing a vote for the larger Build Back Better initiative on November 15.

That bill is expected to contain a number of public health and family policy reforms, along with measures aimed at mitigating the worsening effects of climate change.

The latter piece of legislation has no Republican support, forcing Democratic leaders to win the support of nearly every member of their thin majority in Congress.

WATCH: Democrats see warning signs after stinging election loss

What's included in the new infrastructure bill and how much it will cost
Here's a breakdown of the bill that Biden is expected to soon sign into law:

ROADS AND BRIDGES: $110 billion

The bill would provide $110 billion to repair the nation's aging highways, bridges and roads. According to the White House, 173,000 total miles of America's highways and major roads and 45,000 bridges are in poor condition. And the almost $40 billion for bridges is the single largest dedicated bridge investment since the construction of the interstate highway system, according to President Joe Biden's administration.

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT RAIL: $66 billion

To reduce Amtrak's maintenance backlog, which has worsened since Superstorm Sandy nine years ago, the bill would provide $66 billion to improve the rail service's 457-mile-long Northeast Corridor as well as other routes. It´s less than the $80 billion Biden - who famously rode Amtrak from Delaware to D.C. during his time in the Senate - originally asked for, but it would be the largest federal investment in passenger rail service since Amtrak was founded 50 years ago.

INTERNET ACCESS: $65 billion

The legislation's $65 billion for broadband access would aim to improve internet services for rural areas, low-income families and tribal communities. Most of the money would be made available through grants to states.

MODERNIZING THE ELECTRIC GRID: $65 billion

To protect against the widespread power outages that have become more frequent in recent years, the bill would spend $65 billion to improve the reliability and resiliency of the nation's power grid. It would also boost carbon capture technologies and more environmentally-friendly electricity sources like clean hydrogen.

WATER AND SEWERS: $55 billion

To improve the safety of the nation's drinking water, the legislation would spend $55 billion on water and wastewater infrastructure. The bill would include $15 billion to replace lead pipes and $10 billion to address water contamination from polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS - chemicals that were used in the production of Teflon and have also been used in firefighting foam, water-repellent clothing and many other items.

PUBLIC TRANSIT: $39 billion

The $39 billion for public transit in the legislation would expand transportation systems, improve accessibility for people with disabilities and provide dollars to state and local governments to buy zero-emission and low-emission buses. The Department of Transportation estimates that the current repair backlog is more than 24,000 buses, 5,000 rail cars, 200 stations and thousands of miles of track and power systems.

AIRPORTS: $25 billion

The bill would spend $25 billion to improve runways, gates and taxiways at airports and to improve terminals. It would also improve aging infrastructure at air traffic control towers.

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: $12.5 billion

The bill would spend $7.5 billion for electric vehicle charging stations, which the administration says are critical to accelerating the use of electric vehicles to curb climate change. It would also provide $5 billion for the purchase of electric school buses and hybrids, reducing reliance on school buses that run on diesel fuel.

PAYING FOR IT

The five-year spending package would be paid for by tapping $210 billion in unspent COVID-19 relief aid and $53 billion in unemployment insurance aid some states have halted, along with an array of other smaller pots of money, like petroleum reserve sales and spectrum auctions for 5G services.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10174911/NJ-Gov-Murphy-says-state-Dems-mightve-swept-away-wasnt-progressive-agenda.html/

Murphy crawled to victory in his state's election last week as Democrats under-performed across the country. He's claiming the similar policies to what's in Biden's agenda are what helped him win.

www.dailymail.co.uk